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Bike Lanes

A bike lane is an on-street facility for bicycles, designated by visual separation (a painted line).

 


Example of a bike lane.  A bike lane should be at least 5 feet wide- as the amount of adjacent motor traffic and speed increases, the width of the bike lane should increase.  If motor speeds are routinely above 30mph and volumes are above 10,000 cars a day, then a separated cycle track is preferable.  A city engineering department almost always has speed and volume data.  Volume data is usually on a public web site.


 
Color adds distinction to a bike lane- and also slows down cars. All it took for a makeover on this street was some paint. Note where the old lines use to be (Sandnes, Norway).  Many travel lanes (a lane designated for motor vehicles) have been built overly wide over the last few decades.  A travel lane optimum width is about 10'- in some cases 9' is adequate (slow streets with lots of walk and bike activity) and in some cases 11' is more appropriate (roads with speeds preferred above 30mph).


 
This bike lane (in England) has a signal for the cyclists.


 
Here is a bike lane near Cambridge, MA. A sudden car door opening can put the cyclist in trouble.  This is a poorly designed bike lane.


 
Unmaintained bike lanes are ineffective. This one in Missoula, because of the slush, forces a cylist to ride in the blind-spot of motor vehicles.


 
A community is faced with tradeoffs in accommodating all modes of transportation. Slimmer lane widths for cars, bikes, and pedestrians can prevent the need to tear down buildings and vegetation- but may compromise safety. (near Stavanger, Norway)


 
As this biklane heads to the right, a 'slip', in the shape of a triangle, appears for left turning cyclists.

 

Links:

In:

Seattle Master Bicycle Plan - Seattle Times Newspaper Article

Out:
www.policy.rutgers.edu/papers/
a great piece of research on cycling

www.peopleforbikes.org
'putting more people on bicycles more often through the implementation of TEA-21'

www.bta4bikes.org
Bicycle Transportation Alliance in Portland, Oregon

www.ibike.org
International Bicycle Fund

www.velo.qc.ca
VÈlo QuÈbec

www.bikeplan.com
Tracy/Williams bike/ped consulting (Missoula, MT)